Look At This Lovely Hamster

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"Be rough and razorable; she that from whomWe all were sea-swallow’d, though some cast again(And by that destiny) to perform an actWhereof what’s past is prologue; what to come,In yours and my discharge.”
The Tempest Act 2, scene 1, 245–254

"Be rough and razorable; she that from whom
We all were sea-swallow’d, though some cast again
(And by that destiny) to perform an act
Whereof what’s past is prologue; what to come,
In yours and my discharge.”

The Tempest Act 2, scene 1, 245–254

"O coward conscience, how dost thou afflict me!"
King Richard III (V, iii, 179)

"O coward conscience, how dost thou afflict me!"

King Richard III (V, iii, 179)

And like any good Internet meme, “Look At This Fucking Hipster” has spawned iterations with similar names. “Look At This Lovely Hamster,” for example, is exactly the same, except it’s pictures of hamsters. Is it a parody, is it ironic, or is it completely serious? What’s the difference? I can’t tell. That’s how hip it is. globeandmail.com
"To be, or not to be, that is the question: Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles And by opposing end them.”
Hamlet Act 3, scene 1, 55–87

"To be, or not to be, that is the question:
Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles
And by opposing end them.”

Hamlet Act 3, scene 1, 55–87

"Light, seeking light, doth light of light beguile;So ere you find where light in darkness lies,Your light grows dark by losing of your eyes.”
Love’s Labor’s Lost Act 1. scene 1, 72–79
Thanks, Hannah!

"Light, seeking light, doth light of light beguile;
So ere you find where light in darkness lies,
Your light grows dark by losing of your eyes.”

Love’s Labor’s Lost Act 1. scene 1, 72–79

Thanks, Hannah!

"When you do dance, I wish youA wave o’ th’ sea, that you might ever doNothing but that.” The Winter’s Tale (IV, iv, 159-161)

"When you do dance, I wish you
A wave o’ th’ sea, that you might ever do
Nothing but that.”
The Winter’s Tale (IV, iv, 159-161)

O, how this spring of love resemblethThe uncertain glory of an April day;Which now shows all the beauty of the sun,And by and by a cloud takes all away.The Two Gentlemen of Verona (I, iii, 84-87)Thanks, Violet!

O, how this spring of love resembleth
The uncertain glory of an April day;
Which now shows all the beauty of the sun,
And by and by a cloud takes all away.


The Two Gentlemen of Verona (I, iii, 84-87)
Thanks, Violet!